Nick Reese has done an incredible job of building websites, developing outstanding searchable content and selling other people’s products on his sites. He gets a commission on every sale or lead he sends to the company. So he never had to create his own product in order to build his business (he has since branched out into other areas that you can check out on his new site). Pat Flynn also does an amazing job at this, and he actually shows how much he generates on a monthly basis from his affiliates here.
According to Webopedia, “Search engine optimization is a methodology of strategies, techniques, and tactics used to increase the amount of visitors to a website by obtaining a high-ranking placement in the search results page of a search engine.” And as the internet becomes even more crowded, search engine optimization (or SEO) grows even higher in demand.
The best part about this is that you don’t even have to ever touch the actual product, nor do you have to spend a dime on manufacturing these products. They do all the work for you. You just upload the design, choose the items you want your design to be on, and they’ll handle the rest (i.e. manufacturing, payment, shipping, and handling, returns…).
The biggest advice I can give is to pick a small niche, set up a site and start experimenting. Make mistakes and learn from them. That’s the only way you are going to succeed. Of course, have realistic expectations. It took me more than 1-2 years to start making decent money. But the beauty of it is that once you make that first dollar, you know it works and at that point it just becomes a matter of scaling it up, working harder and smarter to scale up your business.

One of the most underrated freelancing sites ever. The site started as a place where you could get paid to do short tasks for just five bucks. Over the years, it has slowly morphed into one of the biggest gig/freelancing sites where you can now charge any amount to do all kinds of stuff for other peoples. Anything from serious stuff like copywriting, translation, voice over social media management to silly stuff like prank calls and everything in between.
One of the most underrated freelancing sites ever. The site started as a place where you could get paid to do short tasks for just five bucks. Over the years, it has slowly morphed into one of the biggest gig/freelancing sites where you can now charge any amount to do all kinds of stuff for other peoples. Anything from serious stuff like copywriting, translation, voice over social media management to silly stuff like prank calls and everything in between.
Fiverr is one of the biggest providers in the gig economy on the web and you can sell a wide variety of services and products through this medium. Do the research and find out what you can offer. However, keep in mind that like any other money-making task, it takes time to succeed here. And stellar reviews will help you generate more and more income over time.
So, I started reading and learning about affiliate marketing and blogging. I combined the two and after a 14-15 months of really hard work (sitting in front of computer for 14-6 hours a day and putting things I had learned, into action (building a blog, writing articles, promoting the site, etc), I started making enough money that I started believing in myself and the idea that I too could make a full time income online. From then on, I just kept on going and the income grew and grew. Now, I still work 8-10 a day on my online business, and sometimes even more. You have to constantly work and maintain it. Most people think because its online, its easy. That’s where they get it wrong.
5. Fiverr – Fiverr is a great place to make a few bucks or spend a few bucks if you need some of the services people offer. Basically, everything is $5. You either pay $5 or charge $5. They call them “gigs.” You can offer your services however you choose. If you sell art and you’re fine selling pieces for $5 each, that’s a gig. If you’re a graphic designer and you want to offer your services for $10/hour, simply offer a 30 minute gig. If they need two hours of graphic design, they pay you $20, or $10/hour by buying four gigs.
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