I don’t know much about this specific company/website, but I looked at them just now and to be honest, it’s not sitting well with me. For starters, I couldn’t even figure out what the whole “business model” was based on. And that’s usually the case with Ponzi or pyramid schemes. I suspect its something along the lines of a pyramid scheme where you make money by bringing in other paid members, but I am not sure.
Clearly, there's a lot of demand on Amazon, and if any product is going to sell, it's going to sell well on Amazon. But the goal here is to source the right products that will easily sell at the world's largest online retailer. Generally, products between $10 and $50 sell very well here. Just be sure to do the right market research before jumping on this bandwagon.
In most cases, when it’s too good to be true…then it normally is. A good way to check would be to first analyse the site and ensure it is in fact indexed in Google. There is no such thing as “Instant Riches”. I agree with Satrap, if you want to make a lot of money online then you’re going to sacrifice the needed time. Making money online is an art, not a contest.

The insurance and annuity products are obligations of the insurance company and (i) are not insured by the FDIC or any other agency of the United States; and (ii) are not deposits or other obligations of, or guaranteed or insured by, First Hawaiian Bank or any of its affiliates. For certain cash value life insurance products there is investment risk, including the possible loss of value.


While some might think that starting a blog is an arduous effort, when you understand the precise steps you need to take, it becomes far easier. It all starts in the decision of choosing a profitable niche and picking the right domain name. From there, you need to build your offers. You can easily sell things like mini-email courses, trainings and ebooks.
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Dayo, sadly, because of the market size, app related business remain only profitable in a few western countries. I don’t know of any that could be used in Nigeria. That said, you can always put your own twist on things and make something that people in your local area could find useful. Essentially, you create a niche market out of it, and that can be very profitable.
17. Amazon – Have you heard of FBA? It stands for “Fulfilled by Amazon” and it’s getting pretty popular. Basically, you buy products (in bulk is best) and ship them to Amazon for them to store. When your products sell, Amazon packs them up, ships them out and sends you the money (after taking their cut). There are people making a full-time living from FBA, while others just do it for some extra money.

And yes, if you do commit to something like blogging, or writing and freelancing, you can and will make a living (you could even make way more than you could ever at your day job. That said, no matter how much time and effort you put into things like surveys, paid to click sites and things like that, they are not gonna replace your day job. They are just an attitudinal income generation options that you can use in your free time.
Wow! So Jenn gave her personal experience and really didn’t seem rude about it at all. But by responding with name calling and a rather explosive and rude response, you, Doesn’t Matter, are the one that looks like a jerkoff. “You look so freaking inconsiderate. The age of entitlement……….ho hum.” Umm… might want to take a look in the mirror on that one.

Double check yourself, before you double wreck yourself. Make sure everything you send to a company, whether a résumé, an email or a portfolio, is good to go. Double check your grammar and wording, and for God’s sake use spell check! This is especially important when it comes to the company’s name. Don’t spell their name wrong and be sure to type it how they type it (e.g. Problogger, not Pro Blogger).
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