The best part about this is that you don’t even have to ever touch the actual product, nor do you have to spend a dime on manufacturing these products. They do all the work for you. You just upload the design, choose the items you want your design to be on, and they’ll handle the rest (i.e. manufacturing, payment, shipping, and handling, returns…).
Okay. So visual artistry isn’t your thing. You can always try web development instead. If design is the facade of a website, development is the structure. The web developer is the guy who engineers the code that makes websites work. Codecademy (19) offers inexpensive online courses that will give you a solid foundation in web development in as little as a few weeks.
If you’re just starting out in the online business world, you may find it much easier to build a business around a service rather than a product. It is much more straightforward to start, has fewer regulations, and is more sustainable overall. Even if your ultimate goal is to build a product-based business, you should start with a service and build towards that goal.
Clearly, there's a lot of demand on Amazon, and if any product is going to sell, it's going to sell well on Amazon. But the goal here is to source the right products that will easily sell at the world's largest online retailer. Generally, products between $10 and $50 sell very well here. Just be sure to do the right market research before jumping on this bandwagon.
Take good pictures. Some of the options below don’t require you to actually take the picture and sell the product, but for the ones that do, make sure you take a clear picture that makes your product stand out from the others.  If you’re going to be taking a lot of pictures, set up a small “studio-like” area in your home with a backdrop and proper lighting to really make your pictures come across as professional. And of course, you’ll want a good camera too.
If you're ready to enter the ecommerce fray, you could sell your own stuff. Of course, along with selling your own stuff on your own website comes a whole slew of both responsibilities and technical configuration and requirements. For starters, you'll need a website and a hosting account. You'll also need a merchant account like ones offered by Stripe or PayPal. Then you'll need to design that site, build a sales funnel, create a lead magnet and do some email marketing.
Great stuff Sean – as always, packed with tons of valuable information, resources, and proposed next steps. Takes the stress out of where to start and what to do. Also the love wide variety of ways you mention to make some extra coin – everything from SEO work, freelance writing, consulting, and even selling stuff you don’t need/want around the house on CL… awesome! Big-fan of #4 (pre-sell a product). Definitely something I haven’t done yet but will be experimenting with in the next few months. Thanks again man – cheers!
Ebay is a bellwether. It's been around since nearly the start of the online boom. But, like any other platform, success can seem fleeting if you don't know what you're doing. Selling items on eBay, professionally that is, can be an art form. Getting people interested in your auctions isn't always easy, especially when there's hefty competition and low demand for what you're selling.

Another champion that I have a lot of respect for in this arena is Ramit Sethi. He has an amazing continuity program (Ramit’s Brain Trust) and each month provides useful and specific information for his passionate community. The community thrives off of his wise direction and its members pay him monthly to continue getting access to the community and resources. The beauty of this model is you sell something once and get paid each month for it.


You'll also need ecommerce software, fulfillment software, worry about warehousing, customer service and refunds. But that's not all. You'll also need traffic. Think search engine optimization, Facebook ads, and other social media campaigns. It is hard work, especially on your own. You could opt for Amazon's platform, which might be the easier route. But, then again, at the end of the day, this is a serious business, which could produce significant profits. So you're either all in or you're not. 
I think that anything that can provide insight, and further information about ourselves is valuable. I think Carl Jung was a very clever, wise man -he was certainly a physician and explorer into the human condition. So yes, MBTI is a valid human metrics project. Myers Briggs offers us the means to discover our personality type-but as Jung said, we should never be too absolute about personality, it is never a static matter.
I should warn everybody about SlicethePie. I have been a member of slicethepie for about three or four months, and while everything was going great, they are quick to lock your account for any type of reason, even when you are not breaking the terms and conditions. I made sure each and every time I used that website that I was not breaking their terms and conditions, and my account still got locked. So I would just watch out for that. That is just my personal experience with the website though. It may be different for other people.
High-ticket consulting or coaching: You could sell your own high-ticket consulting or coaching products from your website. You'll still need a website, merchant account, sales funnel, lead magnet and many other items. But you can easily earn a substantial amount of money from each individual customer, making it well worth the arduous setup required. 
Be professional. When you submit a résumé, don’t type it in ALL CAPS and please don’t avoid the caps lock like the plague. Know how to use it without looking incompetent. Write in complete sentences with proper grammar. Of course, there will be exceptions, but even with the exceptions, you must keep it professional. You’re building their view of you.
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