Etsy: While Etsy's popularity has declined recently, it's still a great resource for selling handmade items online. No need for complex ecommerce sites or merchant accounts or any sort of automation. The company takes a commission of every sale and charges a small listing fee per item. But many still use Etsy as their primary source of income. The best part is that you can also sell digital products on here such as poster designs. 

Ever since the idea of online auctions came into existence, the online selling market has been on the rise. Many are interested, but don’t know how to get started. There are still all kinds of ways to make money by selling online, whether you’re selling what you already have or buying and selling like a store. Before we get started, here are a few general tips when selling anything online:

Today, if you're at all serious about succeeding in any endeavor, whether online or offline, you have to deliver enormous amounts of value. Yes, you have to do the most amount of work for the least initial return. This is especially true online. Why? Because it takes time to build authority and create an audience, two primary ingredients necessary to succeed in the wonderful world of commerce on the web.
I’ve been doing surveys now for about 18 months, but when i first started i, just like yourself, carried out a lot of research about all the different survey sites and slowly but surely i discovered the best ones to join and now i’m receiving quite a good monthly income from them, but after saying that i am a member of a large number of survey companies and some days i receive that many emails that sometimes i find it hard to keep up with them all, but it is worth it as it’s started to pay off. I’ll not mention all the survey companies i’m with because there’s far too many, but some of the better one’s are Global Test Market, I-Say, Toluna, Mintvine, Your Word, My Survey, Swagbucks, etc, etc. What i do is i keep trying new ones all the time and then i keep the good ones and get rid of the not so good.
Another champion that I have a lot of respect for in this arena is Ramit Sethi. He has an amazing continuity program (Ramit’s Brain Trust) and each month provides useful and specific information for his passionate community. The community thrives off of his wise direction and its members pay him monthly to continue getting access to the community and resources. The beauty of this model is you sell something once and get paid each month for it.
The best part about this is that you don’t even have to ever touch the actual product, nor do you have to spend a dime on manufacturing these products. They do all the work for you. You just upload the design, choose the items you want your design to be on, and they’ll handle the rest (i.e. manufacturing, payment, shipping, and handling, returns…).

20. Etsy – If you like to create arts and crafts, you can sell them on Etsy.It’s completely free to open an Etsy store. You simply sign up, post pictures of your creations and starting selling. You can choose your payment option, but PayPal is generally the easiest. Etsy makes it easy to sell and keep track of your inventory. There is a small listing fee and they take 3.5% of every sale you make.


21. Facebook – Facebook swap shops are great for selling things locally. It’s like CraigsList, but a little easier. You simply search for swap shops in your area and ask to join the group. Once you’re in, take a picture of the item, write a quick description with the price and post it. It doesn’t get much easier than that. You can generally expect to get about what you would get at a yard sale, maybe a little more.
Double check yourself, before you double wreck yourself. Make sure everything you send to a company, whether a résumé, an email or a portfolio, is good to go. Double check your grammar and wording, and for God’s sake use spell check! This is especially important when it comes to the company’s name. Don’t spell their name wrong and be sure to type it how they type it (e.g. Problogger, not Pro Blogger).
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